Biology

Deep sea creatures and their survival skills

Deep sea creatures and their survival skills
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Away from landmass, the ocean covers more than half of our planet and yet it is far beyond our reach. As we go below into the depths of oceans the pressure builds and the temperature drops. Even there is zero sunlight.

Sea Spider - Nerdynaut

Sea spiders
?But in these ocean depths new mysterious creatures appear. The Sea spiders a small relative of the shrimps and crabs has strange leg like appendages which are feathered to stop it from drowning. Also they can enmesh marine snow which it wipes carefully into its jaws.
photo credit : mirror.co.uk
The Artic cucumber was recently discovered in the deep sea and is now one of some 1,250 known sea cucumber species. Sea cucumbers are echinoderms related to sea stars and sea urchins. When threatened, the different species resort to a bizarre arsenal of defenses, which includes sliming their enemies with a web of sticky threads or confusing them by ejecting their own internal organs out of the anus.
photo credit : oceain.si.edu

Artic Cucumber

Artic cucumber

Dumbo octopus - Nerdynaut

Dumbo octopus
No vestige of sunlight penetrates the deep ocean depths and food is very scarce and nothing could afford to waste any energy. The Dumbo octopus has extraordinary flapping ears to hover effortlessly over the sea floor. They do not use the jet propulsion used by their shallow water relatives.
photo credit : oceana.org
T?he weirdest is the Vampire squid from hell. A bioluminescent bacterium shines from pockets on its arms to confuse its predators. The squid’s light show is probably its main form of defense, since it lacks the ink sack which is present in other squid species. It can, however, eject a thick cloud of glowing, bioluminescent mucus from the tips of its arms when threatened.
photo credit : deepseacreatures.org

Vampire squid - Nerdynaut

Vampire squid

pacific hagfish - Nerdynaut

Pacific hagfish
photo credit : phys.org
The pacific hagfish, also known as the slime eel, is a primitive bottom-dweller with no jaws, teeth, or stomach. The animal lacks even true eyes but it does have an incredible, and somewhat disgusting, defense mechanism. When threatened, the hagfish secretes copious amounts of ropy, sticky, slippery and snotty slime. This protein-and-sugar-based ooze is an unappetizing deterrent to predators. When the danger has passed, the hagfish cleans up by tying itself in a simple overhand knot and pulling its body through—scraping it clean.
I?n the deep near the Galapagos Islands, one and half meters down in a site known as the Nine North, there are Giant tube worms. Some worms reach 5m in length. They are the fastest growing marine invertebrates known. Crushing pressure, freezing temperatures and zero sunlight isn’t enough of a challenge for giant tube worms. They have adapted to thrive at the edge of hydrothermal vents, which spew superheated water saturated with toxic chemicals.

Giant tube worms - Nerdynaut

Giant tube worms
photo credit : Wikipedia.org

Frilled Sharks

Frilled Sharks
Humans rarely encounter frilled sharks, which prefer to remain in the oceans’ depths, up to 5,000 feet (1,500 meters) below the surface. Considered living fossils, frilled sharks bear many physical characteristics of ancestors who swam the seas in the time of the dinosaurs.
photo credit : ?Mario Sánchez Bueno
Nautilus spends its days hiding 400 meters down. Its graceful shell contains gas filled floatation chambers that control its depth. It travels shell first so it cannot see where it’s going. It has small tentacles which carry highly developed chemical sensors to detect predators and prey.
photo credit : wikipedia.org

Nautilus

Nautilus
ABOUT YASARA
Hey! I’m Yasara de Mel from Colombo, Sri Lanka. I’m a Science undergraduate at the Open University of Sri Lanka majoring in Zoology. As an individual with a desire to help animals from very young age, I have always wanted to learn about the world of animals. My ultimate goal is to be a voice to the voiceless and conserve nature in the process. I love sharing my knowledge with anyone who is interested in this Zoology because it’s a field which is full of mysteries and interesting facts. I finally found a place where I could share my knowledge with not just few people but the world! I got to know about Nerdynaut through a friend at our university. This platform is ideal for young students like us who are eager to learn and share our knowledge. I thank Nerdynaut for bringing our inner hidden talents to be used for the sake of future goodness.
Yasara De Mel
Hey! I’m Yasara de Mel from Colombo, Sri Lanka. I’m a Science undergraduate at the Open University of Sri Lanka majoring in Zoology. As an individual with a desire to help animals from very young age, I have always wanted to learn about the world of animals. My ultimate goal is to be a voice to the voiceless and conserve nature in the process. I love sharing my knowledge with anyone who is interested in this Zoology because it’s a field which is full of mysteries and interesting facts. I finally found a place where I could share my knowledge with not just few people but the world! I got to know about Nerdynaut through a friend at our university. This platform is ideal for young students like us who are eager to learn and share our knowledge. I thank Nerdynaut for bringing our inner hidden talents to be used for the sake of future goodness.
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13 Comments

13 Comments

  1. imesha

    July 21, 2016 at 3:05 pm

    Wow! Interesting !! Good luck ???

    • Yasara de Mel

      July 21, 2016 at 7:42 pm

      Thank you! Glad you enjoyed this! 🙂

  2. Johana

    July 21, 2016 at 5:46 pm

    Perfect article, and congratulations for wining Nerdhunt. is that a baby lion ?

    • Yasara de Mel

      July 21, 2016 at 7:44 pm

      Thank you! 🙂 yes it’s a baby lion just 2 months old!

      • Johana

        July 21, 2016 at 8:41 pm

        Thatz cool

  3. Nilesh

    July 21, 2016 at 7:51 pm

    Hi Yasara,
    Lovely article. Keep up the good work
    Cheers!

    • Yasara de Mel

      July 21, 2016 at 8:21 pm

      Hello! Thank you! 🙂

  4. Chathurie Niluka Nupearachchi

    July 22, 2016 at 8:10 am

    Thank you for exploring the beauty of Zoology. Enjoyed reading it.
    Keep it up the good work!

    • Chathurie

      July 27, 2016 at 11:00 pm

      Thank you! ^_^

  5. Upeksha

    July 23, 2016 at 9:21 pm

    Hi Yashara,
    First of all I would like to congratulate for your achievement 😀
    and I’m very happy to see you at Nerdynaut platform sharing your experiences with all of us.
    Keep going…
    Cheers!

    • Upeksha

      July 27, 2016 at 10:59 pm

      Thank you for giving me the opportunity! 🙂

  6. Sherin

    July 24, 2016 at 5:12 pm

    Waw

  7. Sherin

    July 27, 2016 at 10:58 pm

    Thank you! 🙂

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